RoundHouseB (1)
York city walls
RoundHouseB (1)
Tel: (+0044)07519144351 Email: drpeteredwards@roundhousehistorytours.co.uk

Modern Tours

Academics will tell you that modern history begins in 1492 with the Italian Wars, whilst English historians cite the accession of Henry VII in 1485 as the dawn of the modern era. Whatever the precise start date, the modern historian is certainly overwhelmed with raw material. From a less literate and populous society, events after 1500 witnessed explosions of population, learning, trade and exploration. Technological change also made very rapid advances. A modern historian tries to bring order to the world that emerged from Tudor times to the 1990s. The sheer mass of historical material forced the fragmentation of the study of history into a range of sub-disciplines; political, diplomatic, social, economic and military, to name but a few. It is only recently that the different disciplines have begun to co-operate far more closely and Roundhouse History Tours certainly reflect engagement with a whole range of historical genres.

Interest in the modern era can encompass the Tudors and Stuarts, the English Civil War, the Georgians, Napoleonic Europe, the Age of Discovery, the Enlightenment, the Reformation, the Victorians, World Wars and Cold War. All these periods are covered by Roundhouse History Tours, either in specific modern tours or city tours and industrial archaeology. Although dominated by great political and military events, the modern era is also host to exceptional cultural, social, technological and economic developments and all these are catered for by Roundhouse in a range of venues stretching from the shores of the Irish Sea to the Baltic coast.

As with all Roundhouse Tours, the itineraries and venues in this section are only suggestions. Each tour is structured to the precise requirements of the client. Please let Dr Peter Edwards know of any personal link to the sites visited so that the guiding can relate to family connections or experiences.

The imposing centrepiece of the Soviet memorial to the fallen in the Battle of Berlin
Typical Soviet iconography, here commemorating the Spartacist Uprising in Berlin in 1919